Wombat Invest adds Space ETF YODA to its UK platform

Fund expansion represents ‘one small step’ forward for Wombat on the 52nd anniversary of the first moon landing: Space Exploration Day, the firm writes. The micro-investing platform Wombat Invest is now offering UK investors access to the burgeoning space economy through Europe’s first space ETF, YODA, which was launched in June.

Europe’s first space ETF counts down to lift off

The fund writes that it is providing a pure-play exposure for UK and European investors to more than 30 space-related companies, including those specialising in satellite technologies, hardware, telecommunications and tourism. They include Virgin Galactic Holdings, Garmin and leading global satellite communications company EchoStar. 

In the US and Canada, investors already have access to a range of five space ETFs, which have a combined USD785 million in assets under management. However, in the UK, Wombat has become one of the first investment platforms to offer an equivalent.
 
‘The Space Age’ – listed on the stock exchange with the ticker YODA – is Wombat’s 25th low-cost, theme-based fund available to investors. Wombat’s mission is to make investing more accessible and its thematic ETFs are a crucial part of its offering to attract new or novice investors.

Since its launch in 2019, Wombat has attracted over 150,000 users, and offers access to a selection of curated UK, US and EU shares alongside its thematic funds.

Kane Harrison, CEO and co-founder of Wombat Invest, comments: “We are delighted to offer investors access to the space economy through Europe’s first space-themed ETF.
“We are always looking for new and exciting additions to our range of theme-based funds and The Space Age’ will perfectly complement our growing selection.

“Our mission is to make investing more accessible for new investors and we believe it is important to capture their imagination. What better way to do that than by offering the opportunity to invest in the space economy 52 years to the day that Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong became the first men to walk on the moon.”

 

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