Dianomi and The Dubs’ research reveals crypto and ETFs are top asset classes investors are searching for

Cryptocurrency coins

A new report from Dianomi and The Dubs reveals the subjects investors are most interested in, via content consumption, search data and internal insights.

The authors write that at a time when investors are demonstrating a growing interest in and seeking guidance on new asset classes such as ETFs and cryptocurrencies on financial news sites, global asset managers continue to produce news content on traditional investment vehicles such as equities and fixed income.

The research from Dianomi, the native ad marketplace for premium brands and publishers, in partnership with The Dubs, a content marketing agency for the financial services sector, suggest ways financial brands could better engage with investors by providing expert content on these newer asset classes. 

As the only native advertising platform that specialises in connecting content from premium financial services brands (with clients including seven of the world’s top 10 largest asset management companies) with the world’s premium financial publishers, Dianomi’s comprehensive database provides rare insights to fuel this research, the firm writes. 

Josh Frith, Founder and MD of The Dubs, says: “An old adage in business is to keep a customer or client happy you need to give them what they want. While this sounds simple, in reality there’s so often a disconnect between what businesses think customers want and what they’re actually looking for. When it comes to the content global asset managers are producing, this certainly appears to be the case.” 

“Marketplace interest in investing has grown substantially over the last 18 months and much of this interest has come from newer investors. Our report shows the areas investors are actively searching for. While some asset managers are not necessarily going to recommend cryptocurrencies, our viewpoint across the world’s premium financial publishers demonstrates a clear commercial opportunity to allocate more content across a wider range of asset classes to match demand.” says Rupert Hodson, CEO of Dianomi. 

“Fundamentally, we believe that by enabling premium financial brands is key to distribute relevant content via the world’s most trusted financial and business publishers, we can help drive and scale both asset managers and media in our marketplace.” 

In the three-month period between April – June 2021, the report categorises approximately. 10.3 million global Google searches by consumers into nine asset classes and products and then compares this against the content of 709 articles produced by global asset managers. 
The key results from which are as follows: 

Asset classes of most interest to investors: ● Cryptocurrency - 18.25 per cent of Google searches but only 2.96 per cent of the articles 

● ETFs - 25.25 per cent of Google searches but only 6.06 per cent of the articles 

● Commodities – 13.55 per cent of Google searches but only 6.06 per cent of the articles 

Asset classes featured most by global asset managers: 

● Fixed Income – 0.72 per cent of Google searches versus 14.25 per cent of the articles 

● Mutual Funds –11.99 per cent of Google searches versus 19.76 per cent of the articles 

● Equities – 15.77 per cent of Google searches versus 28.65 per cent of the articles 

Of the four most searched asset classes - ETFs, Cryptocurrency, Equities and Commodities - the volume of content produced was significantly less for all except Equities, thereby creating an information supply gap in three other asset classes for global asset managers to fill, the authors write. 

Interestingly, despite being a staple in most diversified investment portfolios, the research revealed a significant discrepancy between audience interest in Fixed Income (0.72 per cent of all searches) and a comparative oversupply of information from global asset managers (14.25 per cent of articles produced). 

This low level of interest could be interpreted as an assumed level of understanding among investors, indicating to asset managers that there are other important areas worth exploring. For example, cryptocurrency accounted for 18.25 per cent of all searches across the nine asset classes, displaying the greatest discrepancy between investors’ desire for information and content delivery, at 2.96 per cent of articles produced. 

Falling outside the direct area of expertise of many asset managers, the low level of content is no surprise, the authors write. However, with BlackRock’s move to offer bitcoin investment through two of its funds demonstrating a potential future shift for the industry, and the keen interest amongst investors, there’s a clear information gap to be fulfilled, regardless of your product mix, the authors conclude.
 

Author Profile
Beverly Chandler
Employee title
Managing Editor